Zen and the art of NLP…

One of the reasons I took to NLP so quickly was it a was a practical tool that reinforce my own personal beliefs and gave me a way of expressing and utilising those beliefs.

What am I am on about? Well, for about 10 years I have been a Buddhist. It all start way back in Cheltenham, weird place to decide to be a Buddhist huh? I was in some hippy bar, drunk as a skunk and I had cornered this lovely smiling fella that I had been introduced to about 5 minutes before and was ranting and raving at him about all sorts of things (as I did a lot back then, come to think of it I do a lot of that now…) and suddenly he perked up (after listening very politely to me for about 10 minutes) and said “oh, you should have said you were a Buddhist too, always good to meet another Buddhist”, now at this time I had no real idea what Buddhism was about, all I knew about eastern religion was the mystical stuff from the kung fu movies I used to watch, and some of the stuff my martial arts teachers used to talk about, so my jaw just kinda went slake and I mumbled “ya what?”, to which he replied “well, you have just been talking about the 4 Nobel Truths”, to which I responded “The what”…

But anyway my point is Zen teaches us we should live in the present moment as fully as possible. When the Buddha was asked what his primary teaching was he answered with one word:

“Awareness”.

This ties in closely with the NLP principle of sensory acuity or to have your senses switched on at all times, to gather as much information as possible from our surrounding environment, as well as what is going on “inside” us.

There are several techniques that are available to be help you improve your awareness, but the one I have found most effect is actually a technique employed by the military special forces (they really need to be “switched on”) and that is Commentary Walking, although it could be commentary driving, commentary washing up… The clue of how it works is really in the title; you run an internal dialogue commentary whilst you are doing a task, it forces you pay attention.

You may find it slows you down a little to start off with whilst you start to notice all the things you have been missing and rush to comment on them. But as you practice you will find after awhile your subconscious will take over running the commentary for you and you won’t even notice you are doing it, you will just be a lot more observant and aware and living more thoroughly in the present moment. You don’t need to consciously run commentary all the time but a couple of times a day, for about 10 minutes (I usually do it when I am driving round) and in about 3 weeks you will find you are much more observant.

Be seeing you!

Matt

Categories: NLP

About Matt Caulfield

One Response to “Zen and the art of NLP…”

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